LIES AND POST-TRUTH
VOL. 5, NO. 6, PGS. 1–15

ESPAÑOL

The Long, Numerous, Effective and Harmful Legs of Lying
Lies and Politics in Dictatorship and Democracy in Argentina
Lucas Martín y Camila Luna

Lucas Martín is a professor at the National University of Mar del Plata and a researcher at the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina (CONICET). He is editor of Un pasado criminal. Sudáfrica y Argentina: argumentos y documentos para el debate.

Camila Luna is a professor at the National University of Mar del Plata and a doctoral fellow of the National Council for Scientific and Technical Research of Argentina (CONICET).

This translation has been automatically generated and has not been verified for accuracy.

There is widespread agreement, a generalized perception, on the definition of lying. In its shortest formulation: to say what is not with the intention to deceive. It is not only a matter of stating a falsehood, but also of intending to deceive. Indeed, there are several ways of saying what is not —fiction, irony, error, etc.— but not in all of them there is an intention to deceive. Instead, we can imagine many ways to deceive —from ulterior motives to marketing gimmicks, from secrecy to hypocrisy to intentional misrepresentations— but in all of them we can find a familiarity with lying.

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